Riley

Riley (RealLife Adventure) is our award-winning solution that provides verbose descriptions, designed to help someone to better understand their surroundings.

A Sighted Assistant for the New Collar Workforce

Inspired by a dragon boat team that is blind and visually impaired

Riley uses a smartphone or tablet to allow anyone to tap into the powerful cognitive intelligence of IBM Watson. This opens up a whole new world of independence for workers who can do a job they could not do a job before – made possible through the magic of Riley and Watson.

After our January 9, 2018 launch at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, you can download the Riley app from iTunes and Google Play, or sign up for the Riley server in the cloud.

While Riley was designed with people in mind who are blind and visually impaired, Riley can also help transcend language and education barriers. You won’t know what Riley can do in your workplace until it gets into your own hands. You may envision your own uses for Riley that no one else has imagined.

Technology Stack

Riley uses a smartphone or tablet with Watson Visual Recognition, Watson Text-to-Speech, and Watson Content Hub.

The Riley app can be downloaded from iTunes or Google Play (both after launch on 1/9/2017).

The Riley server can be provisioned in the cloud and trained with industry-specific knowledge. Please contact us directly for information about using Riley to get started with a new collar workforce.

Riley was selected as the winning application for North America in IBM’s prestegious Watson Build Challenge, 2017

Riley in the New Collar Workforce

What’s That? uses visual recognition to recognize and describe objects and scenes…
Train What’s That to know how to classify parts and products specific to your industry.

Look Around provides a verbose description of the user’s surroundings…
Train Look Around to describe your organization’s common and work areas.

Learn More:

Read the Riley white paper here

IBM Industries Blog: How an app designed for people who are blind could solve a global skills shortage